SPM Chemistry Form 4 Notes – Electrochemistry (Part 1)

by BerryBerryTeacher

in Berry Reference (Notes)

The three basic components to learn electrochemistry for SPM Form 4 Chemistry students consist of electrolyte, non-electrolyte and also conductors. While it is clear to students the difference between an electrolyte and non-electrolyte, students typically confuse electrolyte with conductors. So this introductory post, Part 1 on SPM Form 4 Chemsitry series of notes on Electrochemistry by Berry Berry Easy attempts to provide basic information for student to kick start their understanding of this chapter.

[Tips: For those who still cannot understand the difference between an electrolyte and conductor, think in terms of chemical changes and ion/electron flows. This will definitely allow you to understand this topic.]

SPM Chemistry Form 4 Notes – Electrochemistry (Part 1)

Voltaic Cell

Voltaic Cell

Electrolyte

  • Electrolytes are substances that can conduct electricity in molten or aqueous state and undergo chemical changes.
  • It can conduct electricity due to the presence of free moving ions.

Example for electrolytes (alkalis, acids, salt solution or molten salt):

  • molten lead(II) chloride
  • copper(II) sulphate solution
  • solution containing ions such as hydrochloride acid

Non-electrolyte

  • Non-electrolytes are molecules that cannot conduct electricity and will not undergo any chemical changes.
  • It cannot conduct electricity due to the absent of free moving ions.

Example of non-electrolytes (covalent substances):

  • molten acetone
  • molten naphthalene
  • glucose solution

Conductor

  • Conductors are substances that can conduct electricity in solid or molten state but do not undergo any chemical changes.
  • It can conduct electricity due to the flow of electrons.

Example of conductor:

  • iron
  • graphite
  • mercury

Ionic Compounds

Solid state Molten state or aqueous state (dissolved in water)
Do not conduct electricity Can conduct electricity
Ions are held in a lattice -
Ions do not move freely Ions are free to move

Covalent Compounds

Solid state Molten state or aqueous state (dissolved in water)
Do not conduct electricity Do not conduct electricity
Exist in molecules Exist in molecules
Molecules do not have free moving ions Exception: HCl and NH3 exist as free moving ions in water

This is the end of the introductory post on Electrochemistry for SPM Form 4 Chemistry students by Berry Berry Easy. Stay tuned to the next part, Part 2 of the series which focuses on electrolysis in molten compounds.

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March 25, 2013
March 25, 2013

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